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New Zealand government to invest $436 in Auckland City Rail Link

Posted: 5 June 2017 | Intelligent Transport | 2 comments

In New Zealand’s government budget 2017, $436 million will be provided for Auckland’s City Rail Link (CRL).

crl

An artist's impression of Aotea station

In New Zealand’s government budget 2017, $436 million of new capital will be provided for Auckland’s City Rail Link (CRL), as the first tranche of the government’s investment in this critical transport project for Auckland.

crl

An artist’s impression of Aotea station

Funded by Auckland Council and the government, the City Rail Link (CRL) is a new underground rail line linking Britomart and the city centre with the existing western line near Mount Eden. It is estimated to take five-and-a-half years to build.

As part of the project, two new underground stations will be built at Aotea (at an 11m depth) and Karangahape Road (at a 33m depth), as well a redevelopment of Mount Eden station.

“CRL is Auckland’s top new transport priority”

“The government announced in 2016 that it would support accelerating the delivery of the CRL to help address Auckland’s transport needs by committing to fund half of the expected $2.8 billion to $3.4 billion cost,” said Transport Minister Simon Bridges. “CRL is Auckland’s top new transport priority. It will double the capacity of the existing rail network and cut travel time for commuters. The CRL is already bringing economic benefits to Auckland and New Zealand creating hundreds of jobs during construction.”

Once complete, the CRL will be one of New Zealand’s largest-ever transport projects.

The government and Auckland Council are now finalising the necessary funding and governance arrangements that will accompany both parties’ significant investment, including setting up an independent company to deliver the project. Further announcements on the details of these arrangements will be made in the coming months.

The government’s investment in the CRL will be provided progressively through budgets 2017 to 2020.

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2 responses to “New Zealand government to invest $436 in Auckland City Rail Link”

  1. The rail system would be a huge benefit to many, but areas away from the stations would still create traffic issues, either the need to still be in their car, with continuing ongoing traffic and parking issues. I think there in still another option that could also be considered that is cheaper to install and potentially produce greater benefits. What I consider would be a possible answer to these other suburbs that is simpler and cost effective. It is a overhead rail system. About 20 years ago I was introduced to a NZ Engineer who had designed an overhead rail that was installed in Bangkok . It is a series of pods that hold, by memory, 16 passengers on poles above the traffic with pods about 10 minutes apart. There are 2 pods ( each travelling in opposite direction ) with each timed to stop at a stairway and lift at each stop. Being above ground the cost of tunneling, and in Auckland especially, therefore removing of the possible problem of being below the water table, would be substantially reduced. I have seen and used the system in Bangkok and it is very effective and simple. It is also easy to install as I was told that the poles to support the system was easy to install with little or no disruption more than installing power lines.
    Just a thought. Maxwell Brown.

  2. I missed what I consider could be another huge benefit. is that it could be an effective part solution, to the congestion to and from the North Shore, on the harbour bridge, as the pods could bolt onto the bridge.

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